SUN TZU – SUMMARY OF CHAPTERS


CHAPTER 1. LAYING PLANS


3. The art of war, then, is governed by five constant factors, to be taken into account in one’s deliberations, when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field. 
4. These are: (1) The Moral Law; (2) Heaven; (3) Earth; (4) The Commander; (5) Method and discipline. 
11. These five heads should be familiar to every general: he who knows them will be victorious; he who knows them not will fail. 
12. Therefore, in your deliberations, when seeking to determine the military conditions, let them be made the basis of a comparison, in this wise: 
13. (1) Which of the two sovereigns is imbued with the Moral law? (2) Which of the two generals has most ability? (3) With whom lie the advantages derived from Heaven and Earth? (4) On which side is discipline most rigorously enforced? (5) Which army is stronger? (6) On which side are officers and men more highly trained? (7) In which army is there the greater constancy both in reward and punishment?  
14. By means of these seven considerations I can forecast victory or defeat. 

CHAPTER 2. WAGING WAR


 1.  Sun Tzu said: In the  operations of war, where there are in the field a thousand swift chariots, as many heavy chariots, and a hundred thousand mail-clad soldiers, with provisions enough to carry them a thousand LI, the expenditure at home and at the front, including entertainment of guests, small items such as glue and paint, and sums spent on chariots and armour, will reach the total of a thousand ounces of silver per day. Such is the cost of raising an army of 100,000 men. 
10. Poverty of the State exchequer causes an army to be maintained by contributions from a distance. Contributing to maintain an army at a distance causes the people to be impoverished. 
11. On the other hand, the proximity of an army causes prices to go up; and high prices cause the people’s substance to be drained away. 
17. Therefore in chariot fighting, when ten or more chariots have been taken, those should be rewarded who took the first. Our own flags should be substituted for those of the enemy, and the chariots mingled and used in conjunction with ours. The captured soldiers should be kindly treated and kept. 
18. This is called, using the conquered foe to augment one’s own strength. 

CHAPTER 3. ATTACK BY STRATAGEM


3. Thus the highest form of generalship is to balk the enemy’s plans; the next best is to prevent the junction of the enemy’s forces; the next in order is to attack the enemy’s army in the field; and the worst policy of all is to besiege walled cities. 
8. It is the rule in war, if our forces are ten to the enemy’s one, to  surround him; if five to one, to attack him; if twice as numerous, to divide our army into two. 
9. If equally matched, we can offer battle; if slightly inferior in  numbers, we can avoid the enemy; if quite unequal in every way, we can flee from him. 
10. Hence, though an obstinate fight may be made by a small force, in the end it must be captured by the larger force. 
12. There are three ways in which a ruler can bring misfortune upon his army:  
13. (1) By commanding the army to advance or to retreat, being ignorant of the fact that it cannot obey. This is called hobbling the army. 
14. (2) By attempting to govern an army in the same way as he administers a kingdom, being ignorant of the conditions which obtain in an army. This causes restlessness in the soldier’s minds. 
15. (3) By employing the officers of his army without discrimination, through ignorance of the military principle of adaptation to circumstances. This shakes the confidence of the soldiers.  
17. Thus we may know that there are five essentials for victory: (1) He  will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight. (2) He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces. (3) He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks. (4) He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared.  (5) He will win who has military capacity and is not interfered with by the sovereign. 
18. Hence the saying: If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need  not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle. 

CHAPTER 4. TACTICAL DISPOSITIONS


CHAPTER 5. ENERGY


1. Sun Tzu said: The control of a large force is the same principle as the control of a few men: it is merely a question of dividing up their numbers.  
7. There are not more than five musical notes, yet the combinations of these five give rise to more melodies than can ever be heard.  
8. There are not more than five primary colours (blue, yellow, red, white, and black), yet in combination they produce more hues than can ever been seen. 
9. There are not more than five cardinal tastes (sour, acrid, salt, sweet, bitter), yet combinations of them yield more flavours than can ever be  tasted.  
10. In battle, there are not more than two methods of attack: the direct and the indirect; yet these two in combination give rise to an endless series of manoeuvres. 
21. The clever combatant looks to the effect of combined energy, and does not require too much from individuals. Hence his ability to pick out the right men and utilize combined energy. 

CHAPTER 6. WEAK POINTS AND STRONG


22. Though the enemy be stronger in numbers, we may prevent him from fighting. 
24. Carefully compare the opposing army with your own, so that you may know where strength is superabundant and where it is deficient.  
34. The five elements (water, fire, wood, metal, earth) are not always equally predominant; the four seasons make way for each other in turn. There are short days and long; the moon has its periods of waning and waxing. 

CHAPTER 7. MANEUVERING


7. Thus, if you order your men to roll up their buff-coats, and make forced marches without halting day or night, covering double the usual distance at a stretch, doing a hundred LI in order to wrest an advantage, the leaders of all your three divisions will fall into the hands of the enemy.   
8. The stronger men will be in front, the jaded ones will fall behind, and on this plan only one-tenth of your army will reach its destination.  
9. If you march fifty LI in order to outmanoeuvre the enemy, you will lose the leader of your first division, and only half your force will reach the goal.  
10. If you march thirty LI with the same object, two-thirds of your army will arrive.  
11. We may take it then that an army without its baggage train is lost; without provisions it is lost; without bases of supply it is lost.  
20. When you plunder a countryside, let the spoil be divided amongst your men; when you capture new territory, cut it up into allotments for the benefit of the soldiery. 

CHAPTER 8. VARIATION IN TACTICS


12. There are five dangerous faults which may affect a general: (1) Recklessness, which leads to destruction; (2) cowardice, which leads to capture; (3) a hasty temper, which can be provoked by insults; (4) a delicacy of honour  which is sensitive to shame; (5) over-solicitude for his men, which exposes him to worry and trouble.  
13. These are the five besetting sins of a general, ruinous to the conduct of war.  
14. When an army is overthrown and its leader slain, the cause will surely be found among these five dangerous faults.  Let them be a subject of meditation. 

CHAPTER 9. THE ARMY ON THE MARCH


CHAPTER 10. TERRAIN


1.  Sun Tzu said: We may distinguish six kinds of terrain, to wit: (1) Accessible ground; (2) entangling ground; (3) temporizing ground; (4) narrow passes; (5) precipitous heights; (6) positions at a great distance from the enemy. 
13. These six are the principles connected with Earth. The general who has attained a responsible post must be careful to study them.  
14. Now an army is exposed to six several calamities, not arising from natural causes, but from faults for which the general is responsible. These are: (1) Flight; (2) insubordination; (3) collapse; (4) ruin; (5) disorganization; (6) rout.  
15. Other conditions being equal, if one force is hurled against another ten times its size, the result will be the FLIGHT of the former. 

CHAPTER 11. THE NINE SITUATIONS


1. Sun Tzu said: The art of war recognizes nine varieties of ground: (1) Dispersive ground; (2) facile ground; (3) contentious ground; (4) open ground; (5) ground of intersecting highways; (6) serious ground; (7) difficult ground; (8) hemmed-in ground; (9) desperate ground.  
32. The principle on which to manage an army is to set up one standard of courage which all must reach.  
41. The different measures suited to the nine varieties of ground; the expediency of aggressive or defensive tactics; and the fundamental laws of human nature: these are things that must most certainly be studied.  
53. To be ignored of any one of the following four or five principles does not befit a warlike prince.  

CHAPTER 12. THE ATTACK BY FIRE


1.  Sun Tzu said: There are five ways of attacking with fire. The first is to burn soldiers in their camp; the second is to burn stores; the third is to burn baggage trains; the fourth is to burn arsenals and magazines; the fifth is to hurl dropping fire amongst the enemy.  
5. In attacking with fire, one should be prepared to meet five possible developments:  
6. (1) When fire breaks out inside to enemy’s camp, respond at once with an attack from without.  
7. (2) If there is an outbreak of fire, but the enemy’s soldiers remain quiet, bide your time and do not attack.  
8. (3) When the force of the flames has reached its height, follow it up with an attack, if that is practicable; if not, stay where you are.  
9. (4) If it is possible to make an assault with fire from without, do wait for it to break out within, but deliver your attack at a favourable moment.  

CHAPTER 13. THE USE OF SPIES


1. Sun Tzu said: Raising a host of a hundred thousand men and marching them great distances entails heavy loss on the people and a drain on the resources of the State. The daily expenditure will amount to a thousand ounces  of silver. There will be commotion at home and abroad, and men will drop down exhausted on the highways. As many as seven hundred thousand families will be impeded in their labour. 
2. Hostile armies may face each other for years, striving for the victory which is decided in a single day. This being so, to remain in ignorance of the enemy’s condition simply because one grudges the outlay of a hundred ounces of silver in honours and emoluments, is the height of inhumanity.  
7. Hence the use of spies, of whom there are five classes: (1) Local spies; (2) inward spies; (3) converted spies; (4) doomed spies; (5) surviving spies. 
8. When these five kinds of spy are all at work, none can discover the  secret system. This is called “divine manipulation of the threads.” It is the sovereign’s most precious faculty.

From the Lionel Giles Translation.

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