Cicero isn’t a model for saving the state, but a symbol of what destroyed it

Jaclyn Neel, Carleton University When writer Caitlin Flanagan announced the opening of the University of Austin — a proposed private liberal arts college that is “anti-cancel culture” and welcomes academics treated like “thought criminals” — in November, she made a … Continue reading Cicero isn’t a model for saving the state, but a symbol of what destroyed it

AI can reliably spot molecules on exoplanets – and might one day even discover new laws of physics

Kai Hou (Gordon) Yip, UCL and Quentin Changeat, UCL Do you know what the Earth’s atmosphere is made of? You’d probably remember it’s oxygen, and maybe nitrogen. And with a little help from Google you can easily reach a more … Continue reading AI can reliably spot molecules on exoplanets – and might one day even discover new laws of physics

A new species of early human? Why we should be cautious about new fossil footprint findings

Matthew Robert Bennett, Bournemouth University and Sally Christine Reynolds, Bournemouth University A collection of fossil footprints at Laetoli in Northern Tanzania, preserved in volcanic ash and dated to 3.66 million years ago, are still yielding surprises almost 45 years after … Continue reading A new species of early human? Why we should be cautious about new fossil footprint findings

What my 20 years in Afghanistan taught me about the Taliban – and how the west consistently underestimates them

Sippi Azarbaijani Moghaddam, University of St Andrews It was April 1995, and I was preparing to travel to Afghanistan for my first volunteer post with a UK charity. I had travelled to London to meet the Afghanistan director for the … Continue reading What my 20 years in Afghanistan taught me about the Taliban – and how the west consistently underestimates them