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LIST OF GAZANS KILLED BY ISRAELI ATTACKS SO FAR

July 24, 2014

The Gaza health ministry has confirmed the deaths of 754 Palestinians so far in the besieged strip since Israel began its relentless assault on July 8. Among those killed, at least 172 were aged 18 or younger.

Forty-four families have been massacred in Gaza in the past 16 days, according to ministry spokesperson Ashraf al-Qudra.

On Sunday, more than 74 people were killed in al-Shujayeh, a neighborhood east of Gaza City. According to sources in Gaza’s health ministry, 80 percent of the people killed were children under the age of 18, women, and elderly.

The youngest victim so far has been five-month-old Fares Jomaa al-Mahmoum, killed by Israeli tank shelling in Rafah. The next two youngest victims were both 18 months old: Mohammed Malakiyeh was killed along with his 27-year-old mother, and Ranim Jawde Abdel Ghafour was killed along with a member of her family in Khan Younis. The three oldest victims were all 80 years old. Naifeh Farjallah was killed in an air strike on the town of Moghraqa, southwest of Gaza City, and Saber Sukkar was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City. Hijaziyah Hamid al-Helou succumbed on Sunday to wounds sustained in the bombing of her home in Gaza City on Saturday night.

Victims’ names and ages were compiled based on information released by the Gaza health ministry, while the circumstances of the deaths were taken from the ministry and local news sources.

Al-Akhbar will update the list as new information is released.

Tuesday, July 8:

1. Mohammed Sha’aban, 24, was killed in a bombing of his car in Gaza City.
2. Ahmad Sha’aban, 30, died in the same bombing.
3. Khadir al-Bashiliki, 45, died in the same bombing.
4. Rashad Yaseen, 27, was killed in a bombing of the Nusseirat refugee camp in central Gaza.
5. Riad Mohammed Kawareh, 50, was killed in a bombing of his family’s home in Khan Younis.
6. Seraj Ayad Abed al-A’al, 8, was wounded in the same bombing and succumbed to his injuries on Tuesday evening.
7. Mohammed Ayman Ashour, 15, died in the same bombing.
8. Bakr Mohammed Joudah, 22, died in the same bombing.
9. Ammar Mohammed Joudah, 26, died in the same bombing.
10. Hussein Yousef Kawareh, 13, died in the same bombing.
11. Mohammed Ibrahim Kawareh, 50, died in the same bombing.
12. Bassim Salim Kawareh, 10, died in the same bombing.
13. Mousa Habib, 16, from Gaza City’s al-Shujayeh neighborhood, was killed along with his 22-year old cousin while the pair were riding a motorcycle.
14. Mohammed Habib, 22, was killed with Mousa Habib.
15. Sakr Aysh al-Ajouri, 22, was killed in an attack on Jabalia, in northern Gaza.
16. Ahmad Na’el Mehdi, 16, from Gaza City’s Sheikh Radwan neighborhood, was killed in a bombing that wounded two of his friends.
17. Hafiz Mohammed Hamad, 30, an Islamic Jihad commander, was killed in the bombing of his home in Beit Hanoun, along with five of his family members.
18. Ibrahim Mohammed Hamad, 26, died in the same bombing.
19. Mehdi Mohammed Hamad, 46, died in the same bombing.
20. Fawzia Khalil Hamad, 62, died in the same bombing.
21. Dunia Mehdi Hamad, 16, died in the same bombing.
22. Suha Hamad, 25, died in the same bombing.
23. Suleiman Salman Abu Soaween, 22, was killed.

Wednesday, July 9:

24. Abdel Hadi Jamaat al-Sufi, 24, was killed in a bombing near the Rafah crossing.
25. Naifeh Farjallah, 80, was killed in an airstrike on the town of Moghraqa, southwest of Gaza City.
26. Abdel Nasser Abu Kweek, 60, was killed in the bombing of Gaza’s central governorate along with his son.
27. Khaled Abu Kweek, 31, Abdel Nasser Abu Kweek’s son, was killed in the same bombing.
28. Mohammed Areef, 13, died in a bombing in Sha’af.
28. Amir Areef, 10, died in the same bombing.
30. Mohammed Malakiyeh, 18 months old, died in a bombing along with his mother and a young man.
31. Hana Malakiyeh, 27, Mohammed Malakiyeh’s mother, died in the same bombing.
32. Hatem Abu Salem, 28, died in the same bombing.
33. Mohammed Khaled al-Nimri, 22
34. Sahar Hamdan, 40, died in the bombing of her home in Beit Hanoun.
35. Ibrahim Masri, 14, Sahar Hamdan’s son, was killed in the same bombing.
36. Mahmoud Nahid al-Nawasra was killed in a bombing in al-Meghazi.
37. Mohammed Khalaf al-Nawasra, 4, was killed in the same bombing and arrived at the hospital “in shreds.”
38. Nidal Khalaf al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 5, was killed in the same bombing.
39. Salah Awwad al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 6, was killed in the same bombing. His body was found under the rubble of the house.
40. Aisha Nijm al-Meghazi, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
41. Amal Youssef Abdel Ghafour, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
42. Ranim Jawde Abdel Ghafour, an 18-month-old girl, was killed in the same bombing.
43. Rashid al-Kafarneh, 30, was killed when the motorcycle he was riding was bombed.
44. Ibrahim Daoud al-Balawi, 24
45. Abdel Rahman Jamal al-Zamli, 22
46. Ibrahim Ahmad Abideen, 42
47. Mustafa Abu Mar, 20
48. Khalid Abu Mar, 23
49. Mazen Farj al-Jarbah, 30, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
50. Marwan Slim, 27, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
51. Hani Saleh Hamad, 57, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun along with his son Ibrahim.
52. Ibrahim Hamad, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
53. Salima Hassan Musallim al-Arja, 60, was killed in a bombing in Rafah that wounded five others.
54. Maryam Atieh Mohammed al-Arja, 11, was killed in the same bombing.
55. Hamad Shahab, 37
56. Ibrahim Khalil Qanun, 24, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
57. Mohammed Khalil Qanun, 26, was killed in the same attack.
58. Hamdi Badieh Sawali, 33, was killed in the same attack.
59. Ahmad Sawali, 28, was killed in the same attack.
60. Suleiman Salim al-Astal, 55, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
61. Mohammed al-Aqqad, 24
62. Ra’ed Shalat, 37, was killed in a bombing that wounded 6 others.

Thursday, July 10:

63. Asma Mahmoud al-Hajj, 22, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that killed eight members of the same family and wounded 16 other people.
64. Basmah Abdel Fattah al-Hajj, 57, was wounded in the bombing and succumbed to her injuries shortly afterwards.
65. Mahmoud Lutfi al-Hajj, 58, died in the same bombing.
66. Tarek Mahmoud al-Hajj, 18, died in the same bombing.
67. Sa’ad Mahmoud al-Hajj, 17, died in the same bombing.
68. Najla Mahmoud al-Hajj, 29, died in the same bombing.
69. Fatima Mahmoud al-Hajj, 12, died in the same bombing.
70. Omar Mahmoud al-Hajj, 20, died in the same bombing.
71. Ahmad Salim al-Astal, 24, was killed in the bombing of a beach house in Khan Younis that critically wounded more than 15 people.
72. Mousa Mohammed al-Astal, 50, was killed in the same bombing. The two bodies were recovered four hours after the bombing.
73. Ra’ed al-Zawareh, 33, succumbed to his wounds and died. The location of his death was unreported.
74. Baha’ Abu al-Leil, 35, was killed in a bombing.
75. Salim Qandil, 27, was killed in the same bombing.
76. Omar al-Fyumi, 30, was killed in the same bombing.
77. Abdullah Ramadan Abu Ghazzal, 5, was killed in a bombing in Beit Lahiya.
78. Ismail Hassan Abu Jamah, 19, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that injured two children, one critically.
79. Hassan Awda Abu Jamah, 75, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
80. Mohammed Ahsan Ferwanah, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
81. Yasmin Mohammed Mutawwaq, 4 was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
82. Mahmoud Wulud, 26, was killed in a bombing of a civilian vehicle in northern Gaza. His remains were taken to Kamal Adwan Hospital in Jabalia.
83. Hazem Balousha, 30, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
84. Nour Rafik Adi al-Sultan, 27, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
85. Ahmad Zaher Hamdan, 24, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
86. Mohammed Kamal al-Kahlout, 25, was killed in a bombing in Jabalia.
87. Sami Adnan Shaldan, 25, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
88. Jamah Atieh Shalouf, 25, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
89. Bassem Abdel Rahman Khattab, 6, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
90. Abdullah Mustafa Abu Mahrouk, 22, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.

Friday, July 11:

91. Anas Rizk Abu al-Kas, 33, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
92. Nour Marwan al-Najdi, 10, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
93. Mohammed Mounir Ashour, 25, was killed in a bombing on the al-Ghanam family home in Rafah.
94. Ghalia Deeb Jabr al-Ghanam, 7, was killed in the same bombing.
95. Wasim Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 23, was killed in the same bombing.
96. Mahmoud Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 26, was killed in the same bombing.
97. Kifah Shahada Deeb al-Ghanam, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
98. Ra’ed Hani Abu Hani, 31, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
99. Shahraman Ismail Abu al-Kas, 42, was killed in a bombing in a refugee camp in central Gaza.
100. Mazen Mustafa Aslan, 63, was killed in the same bombing.
101. Mohammed Rabih Abu Humeidan, 65, was killed in shelling that struck northern Gaza.
102. Abdel Halim Ashra, 54, was killed in an airstrike on Wednesday in the area of Birka Deir al-Balah, but his body wasn’t discovered until Friday.
103. Saher Abu Namous, 3, was killed in an airstrike on his home in northern Gaza.
104. Hussein al-Mamlouk, 47, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
105. Saber Sukkar, 80, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
106. Nasser Rabih Mohammed Samamah, 49, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.

Saturday, July 12:

107. Rami Abu Massaad, 23, was killed in a strike on Deir al-Balah.
108. Mohammed al-Samiri, 24, was killed in the same attack.
109. Houssam Deeb al-Razayneh, 39, was killed in an attack on Jabalia.
110. Anas Youssef Kandil, 17, was killed in the same attack.
111. Abdel Rahim Saleh al-Khatib, 38, was killed in the same attack.
112. Youssef Mohammed Kandil, 33, was killed in the same attack.
113. Mohammed Idriss Abu Saninah, 20, was killed in the same attack.
114. Hala Wishahi, 31, was killed in an attack on the Mabarra association for the disabled in Jabalia.
115. Suha Abu Saade, 38, was killed in the same attack.
116. Ali Nabil Basal, 32, was killed in a strike on western Gaza City.
117. Mohammed Bassem al-Halabi, 28, was killed in the same strike.
118. Mohammed al-Sowayti, 20, was killed in the same strike.
119. Ibrahim Nabil Humaide, 30, was killed in a bombing in the Tufah neighborhood in eastern Gaza City.
120. Hassan Ahmed Abu Ghoush, 24, was killed in the same attack.
121. Ahmed Mahmoud al-Ballaoui, 26, was killed in the same attack.
122. Ratib Sabahi al-Sifi, 22, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City along with five others.
123. Azmi Mahmoud Abid, 51, was killed in the same attack.
124. Nidal Mahmoud Abu al-Malish, 22, was killed in the same attack.
125. Suleiman Said Abid, 56, was killed in the same attack.
126. Ghassan Ahmad al-Masri, 25, was killed in the same attack.
127. Mustafa Mohammed Anaieh, 58, was killed in the same attack.
128. Rafa’at Youssef Amer, 36, succumbed to wounds sustained in a bombing in Gaza City.
129. Ghazi Mustafa Areef, 62, died when his home in Gaza City was bombed. His son sustained serious injuries.
130. Mohammed Adriss Abu Sulim, 20, was killed in a bombing in Jabaliya.
131. Fadi Yaqub Sakr, 25, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
132. Qassem Jaber Adwan Awdeh, 16, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
133. Mohammed Ahmad Bassal, 19, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
134. Muhannad Youssef Dhahir, 23, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
135. Mahmoud Abdallah Shratiha, 53, was killed in a bombing in north Gaza.
136. Shadi Mohammed Zarb, 21, was killed in a bombing in Rafah that wounded three others.
137. Imad Bassam Zarb, 21, was killed in the same bombing.
138. Nahid Ta’im al-Batash, 41, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City along with 16 family members. Dozens more were wounded in the same attack.
139. Baha Majid al-Batash, 28, was killed in the same bombing.
140. Qassi Isam al-Batash, 12, was killed in the same bombing.
141. Aziza Youssef al-Batash, 59 was killed in the same bombing.
142. Mohammed Isam al-Batash, 17 was killed in the same bombing.
143. Ahmad Naman al-Batash, 27 was killed in the same bombing.
144. Yahya Alaa al-Batash, 18 was killed in the same bombing.
145. Jalal Majid al-Batash, 26 was killed in the same bombing.
146. Mahmoud Majid al-Batash, 22 was killed in the same bombing.
147. Marwa Majid al-Batash, 25 was killed in the same bombing.
148. Majid Subhi al-Batash was killed in the same bombing.
149. Khalid Majid al-Batash, 20 was killed in the same bombing.
150. Ibrahim Majid al-Batash, 18 was killed in the same bombing.
151. Manar Majid al-Batash, 14 was killed in the same bombing.
152. Amal Hassan al-Batash, 49 was killed in the same bombing.
153. Anas Alaa al-Batash, 10 was killed in the same bombing.
154. Qassi Alaa al-Batash was killed in the same bombing.

Sunday, July 13:

155. Rami Abu Shanab, 25, succumbed to wounds sustained several days ago in Deir al-Balah.
156. Khawla al-Hawajri, 25, was killed in a bombing in Nusseirat.
157. Mohammed Ghazi Areef, 35, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
158. Ahmad Youssef Daloul, 47, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
159. Hijaziyah Hamid al-Helou, 80, succumbed to wounds sustained in the bombing of her home in Gaza City on Saturday night.
160. Fawzia Abdel A’el, 73, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
161. Haitham Ashraf Zarb, 21, succumbed to wounds sustained during an attack on Rafah on Saturday that killed two other members of the Zarb family.
162. Leila Hassan al-Awdat, 41, was killed in an attack on Meghazi that wounded four others.
163. Hussam Ibrahim al-Najjar, 14, was killed in a bombing in north Gaza. His remains were taken to Beit Hanoun Hospital.
164. Rawidah Abu Harb al-Zwaida, 31, was killed.
165. Samer Tallal Hamdan was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
166. Hussein Abd al-Qadir Muheisen, 19, succumbed to wounds sustained in Gaza City.
167. Maher Thabit Abu Mar, 24, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
168. Mohammed Salim Abu Bureis, 65, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
169. Saddam Moussa Moamar, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
170. Mousa Shehade Moamar, 60, was killed in Khan Younis.
171. Hanadi Hamadi Moamar, 27, was killed in Khan Younis.
172. Adham Mohammed Abed al-Fatah Abed al-Al was killed in Gaza.

Monday, July 14:

173. Qassem Tallal Hamdan, 23, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
174. Hamid Suleiman Abu al-Araj Deir al-Balah, 60.
175. Abdullah Mahmoud Barakah, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
176. Tamer Salem Kodeih, 37, was killed in Khan Younis.
177. Ziad Maher al-Najjar, 17, was killed in Khan Younis.
178. Ziad Salem al-Shawi, 25, was killed in Rafah.
179. Mohammed Yasser Hamdan, 24, was killed in Gaza.
180. Mohammed Shakib al-Agha, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
181. Mohammed Younis Abu Youssif, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
182. Sara Omar Sheikh al-Eid, 4, was killed in Rafah.
183. Omar Ahmad Sheikh al-Eid, 24, was killed in Rafah.
184. Jihad Ahmad Sheikh al-Eid, 48, was killed in Rafah.
185. Kamal Ated Youssif Abu Taha, 16, was killed in Khan Younis.
186. Ismail Nabil Ahmad Abu Hatab, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.

Tuesday, July 15:

187. Ahmad Younis Abu Youssif, 28, was killed in Khan Younis.
188. Bushra Khalil Zoarob, 53, was killed in Rafah.
189. Atwa Amira al-Maamour, 63, was killed in Khan Younis.
190. Ismail Salim al-Najjar, 46, was killed in Khan Younis.
191. Mohammed Ahmad Ibrahim al-Najjar, 49, was killed in Khan Younis.
192. Suleiman Abu Louli, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
193. Sobhi Abdel Hamid Moussa, 77, was killed in Khan Younis.
194. Ismail Ftouh, 24, was killed in Gaza.
195. Saleh Said Dahliz Rafah, 20, was killed in Rafah.
196. Yasser Abdel Mahmoun, 18, was killed in Rafah.
197. Ibrahim Khalil al-Asaafi, 66, was killed in Jiher el-Deek.
198. Mohammed Abdullah al-Zahouk, 23, was killed in Rafah.
199. Mohammed Ismail Abu Awda, 27, was killed in Rafah.

Wednesday, July 16:

200. Mohammed Sabri al-Dibari, 20, was killed in Rafah.
201. Abdullah Mohammed Abdullah al-Irjani, 19, was killed in Khan Younis.
202. Ahmad Adel Ahmad al-Niwajha, 23, was killed in Rafah.
203. Mohammed Tayseer Sharab, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
204. Farid Mohammed Abu Daqa, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
205. Ashraf Khalil Abu Shanab, 33, was killed in Rafah.
206. Khadra al-Abd Salama Abu Daqa, 65, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
207. Omar Ramadan Hassan Abu Daqa, 24, was killed in the same attack.
208. Ibrahim Ramadan Hassan Abu Daqa, 10, was killed in the same attack.
209. Abdel Rahman Ibrahim Khalil al-Sarkhi, 37, was killed in an attack on Gaza City.
210. Ahed Atef Bakr, 10, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
211. Zakaria Ahed Bakr, 10, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
212. Mohammed Ramez Bakr, 11, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
213. Ismail Mohammed Bakr, 9, was killed on a beach in Gaza.
214. Hamza Ra’ed Thari, 6, succumbed to wounds sustained “a few days ago” and passed away.
215. Mohammed Akram Abu Amer, 34, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
216. Kamal Mohammed Abu Amer, 38, Mohammed’s brother, was reported seriously injured and then dead in the same attack.
217. Raqia al-Astal, 70, was killed in the bombing of a mosque in Khan Younis which killed at least three others and critically wounded several children.
218. Yasmin al-Astal, 4, was killed in the same attack.
219. Hussein Abdel Nasser al-Astal, 23, was killed in the same attack.
220. Usama Mahmoud al-Astal, 6, was critically wounded in the same attack and succumbed to his wounds shortly afterwards.
221. Hossam Shamlakh, 23, succumbed to wounds sustained in an attack on Sheikh Ajlin.
222. Mohammed Kamal Abdel Rahman, 30, was killed in an attack on Sheikh Ajlin.

Thursday, July 17:

223. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Qadim, 22, succumbed to wounds sustained in Deir al-Balah.
224. Zeinab Mohammed Saeed al-Abadleh, 70, died of her wounds in the Gaza European hospital.
225. Mohammed Abdel Rahman Hassouneh, 67, was killed in an attack on Rafah.
226. Mohammed Ahmad al-Hout, 41, was killed in the same attack while on his way to morning prayers.
227. Ahmad Rihan, 23, was killed in an attack on North Gaza.
228. Salam Salah Fayyad, 25, succumbed to his wounds in a hospital in Gaza’s central province.
229. Abdallah al-Akhras, 27, was killed in an attack on Rafah.
230. Bashir Abd al-A’el, 20, was killed in the same attack.
231. Mohammed Ziyad Ghanem, 25, was killed in the same attack.
232. Fulla Tarek Shaheber, 8, was killed along with two child relatives in an airstrike on their home in Gaza City.
233. Jihad Issam Shaheber, 10, was killed in the same strike.
234. Wassim Issam Shaheber, 9, was killed in the same strike.
235. Yassin al-Humaideh, 4, died of wounds suffered in an earlier attack on Gaza City.
236. Rahaf Khalil al-Jabbour, 4, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis.
237. Hamza Houssam al-Abadaleh, 29, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
238. Abed Ali Natiz, 26, was killed in Gaza.
239. Mohammed Salem Natiz, 4, was killed in Gaza City.
240. Mohammed Shadi Natiz, 15, was killed in Gaza City.
241. Salah Salah al-Shafiai was killed in Khan Younis.
242. Majdi Suleiman Salamah Jabarah, 22, was killed in Rafah.
243. Fares Jomaa al-Mahmoum, 5 months old, was killed in Rafah.

Friday, July 18:

244. Nassim Mahmoud Nassir was killed in an attack on Beit Hanoun.
245. Karam Mahmoud Nassir was killed in the same attack.
246. Omar Ayyad al-Mahmoum, 18, from Rafah, was killed in an attack on al-Shawka.
247. Salmiah Suleiman Ghayyad, 70, was killed in an attack east of Rafah.
248. Rami Saqqer Abu Tawila was killed in an attack east of al-Shujayeh that wounded 7 of his family members.
249. Hamad Abu Lahyia, 23, was killed in an attack east of Qarara that critically wounded several others.
250. Bassem Mohammed Mahmoud Madi, 22, was killed in an attack east of Rafah that wounded 11 others.
251. Mohammed Abdel Fattah Rashad Fayyad, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
252. Mahmoud Mohammed Fayyad, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
253. Bilal Mahmoud Radwan, 23, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis.
254. Mundhir Radwan, 22, was killed in the same attack.
255. Ahmad Fawzia Radwan, 23, was killed in the same attack.
256. Mahmoud Fawzia Radwan, 24, was killed in the same attack.
257. Ismail Youssef Taha Qassim, 59, was killed in an attack in Beit Hanoun that wounded 25 others.
258. Amal Khadir Ibrahim Badour, 40, was killed in the same attack.
259. Hani As’ad Abd al-Karim al-Shami, 35, was killed in an attack in Khan Younis that killed his nephew and wounded 4 others.
260. Mohammed Hamdan Abd al-Karim al-Shami, 35, was killed in the same attack.
261. Hussam Muslim Abu Eissa, 26, was killed in Jahr al-Dik.
262. Walaa Abu Ismail Muslim,12, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
263. Mohammed Abu Muslim, 13, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
264. Ahmad Abu Muslim, 14, was killed in Abraj al-Nada.
265. Ahmed Abdullah al-Bahnasawi, 25, was killed in the village of Om al-Nasr in Gaza.
266. Saleh Zaghidi, 20, was killed in Rafah.
267. Alaa Abu Shbat, 23, was killed in Rafah.
268. Ahmed Hasan Saleh al-Ghalban, 23, was killed in al-Fakhari.
269. Hamada Abdallah al-Bashiti, 21, was killed in al-Fakhari.
270. Abdullah Jamal al-Samiri, 17, was killed in Khan Younis.
271. Mahmoud Ali Darwish, 40, was killed in Nusseirat.
272. Wila al-Qara, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
273. Raafat Mohammed al-Bahloul, 35, was killed in Khan Younis.
274. Mohammed Awad Matar, 37, was killed in Beit Lahia.
275. Hamza Mohammed Abu al-Hussein, 27, was killed in Rafah.
276. Imad Hamed Alouwein, 7, was killed in a strike in Gaza City.
277. Qassem Hamed Alouwein, 4, was killed in the same strike.
278. Sara Mohammed Boustan, 13, was killed in a strike in Gaza City.
279. Rizk Ahmed al-Hayek, 2, was killed in Gaza City.
280. Mohammed Saad Mahmoud Abu Saade, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
281. Naim Moussa Abu Jarad, 24, was killed in tank shelling on his home in Beit Hanoun along with seven members of his family.
282. Abed Moussa Abu Jarad, 30, was killed in the same attack.
283. Siham Moussa Abu Jarad, 15, was killed in the same attack.
284. Rijaa Alyan Abu Jarad, 31, was killed in the same attack.
285. Ahlam Naim Abu Jarad, 13, was killed in the same attack.
286. Hania Abdel Rahman Abu Jarad, 3, was killed in the same attack.
287. Samih Naim Abu Jarad, 1, was killed in the same attack.
288. Moussa Abdel Rahman Abu Jarad, 6, was killed in the same attack.
289. Moustafa Faysal Abu Sanina, 18, was killed in an air strike on Rafah along with two relatives.
290. Imad Faysal Abu Sanina, 18, was killed in the same attack.
291. Nizar Fayez Abu Sanina, 38, was killed in the same attack.
292. Ghassan Salem Moussa, 28, was killed in Khan Younis.
293. Mohammed Salem Shaat, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
294. Ahmed Salem Shaat, 22, was killed in the same attack.
295. Amjad Salem Shaat, 15, was killed in the same attack.
296. Mohamed Talal al-Sanaa, 20, was killed in Rafah.

Saturday, July 19:

297. Ayad Ismail al-Rakib, 26, was killed in an attack on Khan Younis.
298. Yehya Bassam al-Sirri, 20, was killed in Khan Younis.
299. Mohammed Bassam al-Sirri, 17, was killed in the same attack.
300. Mahmoud Redda Salhia, 56, was killed in Khan Younis.
301. Moustafa Redda Salhia, 21, was killed in the same attack.
302. Mohammed Moustafa Salhia, 22, was killed in the same attack.
303. Wissam Redda Salhia, 15, was killed in the same attack.
304. Ibrahim Jamal Kamal Nasser, 13, was killed in Khan Younis.
305. Ahmed Mahmoud Hassan Aziz, 34, Khan Younis.
306. Said Ola Issa, 30, was killed in the central disrict.
307. Mohammed Awad Fares Nassar, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
308. Mohammed Jihad al-Kara, 29, was killed in Khan Younis.
309. Rashdi Khaled Nassar, 24, was killed in the same Khan Younis.
310. Raed Walid Likan, 27, was killed in Khan Younis.
311. Raafat Ali Bahloul, 36, was killed in Khan Younis.
312. Bilal Ismail Abu Daqqah, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
313. Mohammed Ismail Samour, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
314. Ismail Ramadan al-Lawalhi, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
315. Mohammed Ziad al-Rahhel, 6, was killed in Beit Lahia.
316. Mohammed Ahmed Abu Zaanounah, 36, was killed in Gaza.
317. Mohammed Rafic al-Rahhel, 22, was killed in Beit Lahia.
318. Fadel Mohammed al-Banna, 29. was killed in Jbalia.
319. Mohammed Atallah Awdeh Saadat, 25, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
320. Mohammed Abedel Rahman Abu Hamad, 25, was killed in Beit Lahia.
321. Maali Abedel Rahman Suleiman Abu Zayed, 24, al-Wista.
322. Mahmoud Abdel Hamid al-Zuweidi, 23, was killed in Beit Lahia.
323. Dalia Abdel Hamid al-Zuweidi, 37, was killed in Beit Lahia.
324. Ruaia Mahmoud al-Zuweidi, 6, was killed in Beit Lahia.
325. Nagham Mahmoud al-Zuweidi, 2, was killed in Beit Lahia.
326. Amer Hamoudah, 7, was killed in Beit Lahia.
327. Mahmoud Rizk Mohammed Hamoudah, 18, was killed in Beit Lahia.
328. Mohammed Khaled Jamil al-Zuweidi, 20, was killed in Beit Lahia.
329. Mohammed Ahmad al-Saidi, 18, was killed in Khan Younis.
330. Abdel Rahman Mohammed Awdah Barak, 23, al-Wista.
331. Tarek Samir Khalil al-Hitto, 26, was killed in al-Wista.
332. Mahmoud al-Sharif, 24, was killed in al-Wista.
333. Mohammed Fathi al-Ghalban, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
334. Mahmoud Anwar Abu Shabab, 16, was killed in Rafah.
335. Mo’men Taysir al-Abed Abu Dan, 24, was killed in al-Wista.
336. Abdel Aziz Samir Abu Zeiter, 31, was killed in al-Wista.
337. Mohammed Ziad Zaabout, 24, was killed in Gaza.
338. Hatem Ziadah Zaabout, 22, was killed in Gaza.
339. Ahmad Maher Mohammed Abu Thuria, 25, was killed in al-Wista.
340. Abdullah Ghazi Abdullah al-Masri, 30, was killed in al-Wista.
341. Ayman Hisham al-Naaouq, 25, was killed in al-Wista.
342. Akram Mahmoud al-Matwouk, 37, was killed in Jabalia.
343. Salem Ali Abu Saadah was killed in Khan Younis.

Sunday, July 20:

344. Hosni Mahmoud al-Absi, 56, was killed in Rafah.
345. Mohammed Mahmoud Moamar, 30, was killed in Rafah,
346. Hamza Mahmoud Moamar, 21, was killed in Rafah.
347. Anas Mahmoud Moamar, 17, was killed in rafah.
348. Mohammed Ali Jundieh, 38, was killed in Gaza.
349. Mohammed Khalil al-Hayyah
350. Osama Khalil al-Hayyah
351. Khalil Osama al-Hayyah
352. Hala Saqer Abu Hin
353. Fahmi Abdel Aziz Abu Said, 29, was killed in al-Wista.
354. Ahmad Tawfiq Zannoun, 26, was killed in Rafah.
355. Sohaib Ali Jomaa Abu Qoura, 21, was killed in Rafah.
356. Homeid Sobh Mohammed Abu Foujo, 22, was killed in Rafah.
357. Toufic Marshoud, 52, was killed in Gaza.
358. Ibrahim Khalil Abd Ammar, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
359. Ibrahim Salim Joumea al-Sahbani, 20, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
360. Ibrahim Arrif Ibrahim al-Ghalayini, 26, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
361. Osama Khalil Ismail al-Hayya, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
362. Osama Roubhi Shahta Ayyad, 31, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
363. Isra Yassir Atieh Hamidieh, 28, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
364. Akram Mohammed Ali al-Skafi, 63, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
365. Iman Khalil Abed Ammar, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
366. Iman Mohammed Ibrahim Hamadeh, 40, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
367. Ahmad Ishaq Youssef al-Ramlawi, 33, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
368. Ahmad Sammi Diab Ayyad, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
369. Ahmad Mohammed Ahmad Abu Zanouna, 28, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
370. Imama Isama Khalil al-Hayya, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
371. Talla Akram Ahmad al-Atwi, 7, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
372. Tawfiq Ibrawi Salem Marshoud, 52, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
373. Hatim Ziad Ali al-Zabout, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
374. Khalid Riyad Mohammed Hamad, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
375. Khadija Ali Moussa Shahadi, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
376. Khalil Osama Khalil al-Hayya, 7, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
377. Khalil Salim Ibrahim Mousbah, 53, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
378. Dima Adil Abdullah Aslim, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
379. Dina Rushdi Omar Hamadi, 15, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
380. Rahaf Akram Ismail Abu Joumea, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
381. Saji Hassan Akram al-Hallaq, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
382. Samia Hamid Mohammed al-Shaykh Khalil, 3, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
383. Soad Mohammed Abdel Razik al-Hallaq, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
384. Samar Osama Khalil al-Hallaq, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
385. Shadi Ziad Hassan Aslim, 15, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
386. Shireen Fathi Othman Ayyad, 18, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
387. Adil Abdullah Salim Aslim, 39, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
388. Assem Khalil Abed Ammar, 4, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
389. Ahed Saed Moussa al-Sirsik, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
390. Ayisha Ali Mahmoud Zayid, 54, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
391. Abdel Rahman Akram Mohammed al-Skafi, 22, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
392. Abdel Rahman Abdel Razak Abdel Rahman al-Shaykh Khalil, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
393. Abdullah Mansour Radwan Ammara, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
394. Abed Rabboh Ahmad Mohammed Zayid, 58, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
395. Isam Atieh Said al-Skafi, 26, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
396. Ola Ziad Hassan Aslim, 11, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
397. Alaa Jamal al-Din Mohammed Bourda, 35, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
398. Ali Mohammed Hassan al-Skafi, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
399. Omar Jamil Soubhi Hammouda, 10, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
400. Ghada Soubhi Sa’adi Ayyad, 9, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
401. Ghada Ibrahim Suleiman Udwan, 39, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
402. Fadi Ziad Hassan Aslim, 10, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
403. Fatima Abdel Rahim Abdel Qadir Abu Ammouna, 55, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
404. Fida’a Rafiq Diab Ayyad, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
405. Fahmi Abdel Aziz Sa’ed Abu Said, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
406. Qinan Hassan Akram al-Hallaq, 6, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
407. Maysa Abdel Rahman Said al-Sirsawi, 37, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
408. Mohammed Ashraf Rafiq Ayyad, 6, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
409. Mohammed Hassan Mohammad al-Skafi, 53, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
410. Mohammed Rami Fathi Ayyad, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
411. Mohammed Ra’ed Ihsan Aqqila, 19, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
412. Mohammed Ziad Ali al-Zabbout, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
413. Mohammed Mohammed Ali Muharrib Jundiyah, 38, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
414. Mohammed Hani Mohammad al-Halaq, 2, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
415. Marrah Shakil Ahmad al-Jammal, 11, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
416. Marwan Mounir Saleh Qunfud, 23, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
417. Marwa Salman Ahmad al-Sirsawi, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
418. Moussaeb al-Khayr Salah al-Din Said al-Skafi, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
419. Mona Suleiman Ahmad al-Sheikh Khalil, 49, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
420. Mona Abdel Rahman Mahmoud Ayyad, 42, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
421. Nirmin Rafiq Diab Ayyad, 20, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
422. Hala Akram Hassan al-Hallaq, 27, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
423. Hala Soubhi Saidi Ayyad, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
424. Hala Saqr Hassan al-Hayya, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
425. Hani Mohammed Ahmad al-Hallaq, 29, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
426. Hiba Hamid Mohammed al-Shaykh Khalil, 13, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
427. Youssef Ahmad Younis Mustafa, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
428. Youssef Salim Hamto Habib, 62, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
429. Unknown
430. Mohammed Ayman al-Shaer, 5, was killed in Khan Younis.
431. Leila Hasan al-Shaer, 33, was killed in Khan Younis.
432. Salah Saleh al-Shaer, in his forties, was killed in Khan Younis.
433. Hibatullah Akram al-Shaer, 7, was killed in Khan Younis.
434. Youssef Sha’aban Ziyadeh, 44, was killed in al-Barij.
435. Jamil Sha’aban Ziyadeh, 53, was killed in the same attack.
436. Sha’aban Jamil Ziyadeh, 12, was killed in the same attack.
437. Omar Sha’aban Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
438. Muftiya Mohammed Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
439. Bayyan Abdel Latif Ziyadeh was killed in the same attack.
440. Ismail al-Qurdi
441. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Muqadama, 30, was killed in the same attack.
442. Najah Sa’ad al-Din Daraji, 65, was killed in Rafah.
443. Abdullah Youssef Daraji, 3, was killed in the same attack.
444. Mohammed Baghdar al-Dughma, 20, was killed in Beni Soheileh.
445. Mohammed Raja’ Mohammed Handam, 15, was killed in Rafah.
446. Aya Bahjat Abu Sultan, 15, was killed in Beit Lahya.
447. Hani Mohammed al-Halaq, 29, was killed in al-Ramal.
448. Suad Mohammed al-Halaq, 62, was killed in the same attack.
449. Qinan Akram al-Halaq, 5, was killed in the same attack.
450. Samar Osama al-Halaq, 29, was killed in the same attack.
451. Saji al-Halaq was killed in the same attack.
452. Ibrahim Khalil Ammar was killed in the same attack.
453. Ahmad Yassin was killed in the same attack.
454. Rayan Taysir Abu Jamea, 8, was killed in Khan Younis.
455. Fatima Mahmoud Abu Jamea was killed in the same attack.
456. Sabah Tawfiq Mahmoud Abu Jamea, 38, was killed in the same attack.
457. Rozan Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 14, was killed in the same attack. Her body was recovered from the rubble on Monday.
458. Jawdat al-Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
459. Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 5, was killed in the same attack.
460. Haifa Tawfiq Ahmad Abu Jamea, 9, was killed in the same attack.
461. Yasmin Ahmad Salama Abu Jamea, 25, was killed in the same attack.
462. Suheila Bassam Ahmad Abu Jamea was killed in the same attack.
463. Shahinaz Walid Ahmad Abu Jamea, 1, was killed in the same attack.
464. Hossam Hossam Abu Qaynas, 5, was killed in the same attack.
465. An unidentified woman was killed in the same attack.
466. An unidentified woman in her 30s was killed in the same attack.
467. An unidentified child was killed in the same attack.
468. Ahmad Suleiman Mahmoud Sahmoud, 34, was killed in the same attack.
469. Minwa Abdel Bassit Ahmad al-Sabea, 37, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
470. Mahmoud Moussa Abu Anzar, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
471. Turkiyah al-Abed al-Biss
472. Unidentified body in Kamal Adwan Hospital.
473. Unidentified body in Kamal Adwan Hospital.
474. Abdullah Omar al-Maghribi was killed in Rafah.
475. Najah al-Maghribi was killed in the same attack.
476. Bassem al-Brayim was killed in Khan Younis.
477. Ra’ed Mansour Nayfeh was killed in Gaza City.
478. Fuad Jaber was killed in Gaza City.
479. Mohammed Mahmoud Hussein Moammar was killed in Rafah.
480. Hamza Mahmoud Hussein Moammer was killed in the same attack.
481. Anas Mahmoud Hussein Moammer was killed in the same attack.
482. Bilal Jaber Mohammed al-Ashhab, 22, was killed in al-Mughraqa.
483. An unidentified body was recovered along with Bilal.
484. Ra’ed Ismail al-Bardawil, 26, was killed in Rafah.
485. Unknown
486. Unknown
487. Unknown
488. Unknown
489. Unknown
490. Unknown
491. Unknown
492. Unknown

Monday, July 21:

493. Sumoud Nasr Siyam, 26, was killed in Rafah.
494. Mohammed Mahrous Salam Siyam, 25, was killed in the same attack.
495. Badr Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 25, was killed in the same attack.
496. Ahmad Ayman Mahrous Siyam, 17, was killed in the same attack.
497. Mustafa Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 12, was killed in the same attack.
498. Ghaydaa Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 8, was killed in the same attack.
499. Shireen Mohammed Salam Siyam, 32, was killed in the same attack.
500. Dalal Nabil Mahrous Siyam, 8, was killed in the same attack.
501. Kamal Mahrous Salama Siyam, 27, was killed in the same attack.
502. Abdullah Trad Abu Hjeir, 16, was killed in Nusseirat.
503. Ahmad Moussa Shaykh al-Eid, 23, was killed in Rafah.
504. Zakariah Massoud al-Ashqar, 24, was killed in Gaza City.
505. Kamal Talal Hassan al-Masri, 22, was killed in Beit Hanoun.
506. Ra’ed Isam Daoud, 30, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
507. Fatima Abu Ammouna, 55, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
508. Ahmad Mohammed Azzam, 19, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
509. Mahmoud Hassan al-Nakhala was killed in Gaza.
510. Kamal Massoud, 21, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
511. Saleh Badawi, 31, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
512. Unidentified body in the Gaza European hospital.
513. Majdi Mahmoud al-Yazaji, 56, was killed in Gaza City.
514. Mohammed Samih al-Ghalban was killed in Gaza City.
515. Karam Ibrahim Atieh Barham, 25, was killed in Khan Younis.
516. Nidal Ali Abu Daqqa, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
517. Nidal Joumea Abu Assi, 43, was killed in Khan Younis.
518. Mohammed Mahmoud al-Maghribi, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
519. Mayar al-Yazaji, 2, was killed in al-Karama.
520. Yasmin al-Yazaji was killed in the same attack.
521. Wajdi al-Yazaji was killed in the same attack.
522. Safinaz al-Yazaji was killed in the same attack.
523. Unidentified child, 5, was killed in the same attack.
524. Mahran Kamel Jondeyah, 32, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
525. Tamer Nayef Jondeyah, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
526. Rahma Ahmad Jondeyah, 50, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
527. Ibrahim Shaaban Bakroun, 37, was killed in al-Shaaf
528. An unidentified person was killed in the Israeli shelling of Al Aqsa Martyrs Hospital. The attack killed three others and wounded 50.
529. An unidentified person was killed in the same attack.
530. An unidentified person was killed in the same attack.
531. An unidentified person was killed in the same attack.
532. Youssef Ghazi Hamidieh, 25, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
533. Moataz Jamal Hamidieh, 18, was killed in the same attack.
534. Aed Jamal Hamidieh, 21, was killed in the same attack.
535. Aya Yasser al-Qassas was killed in Gaza City.
536. Aesha Yasser al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
537. Nasma Iyad al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
538. Lamyaa Iyad al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
539. Israa al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
540. Yasmin al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
541. Arwa al-Qassas was killed in the same attack.
542. Aliaa al-Syam was killed in Gaza City.
543. Fayza al-Syam was killed in Gaza City.
544. Soumaya al-Syam was killed in Gaza City.
545. Fatima Ahmad al-Arja was killed in Rafah.
546. Atieh Youssef Dardouna, 26, was killed in Jabalia.
547. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
548. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
549. Unidentified was killed in Rafah.
550. Fadi Azmi Brayaem was killed in Deir al-Balah.
551. Othman Salem Brayaem was killed in the same attack.
552. Salem Abdel Majeed Brayaem was killed in the same attack.
553. Unidentified was killed in al-Shamaa mosque in Gaza City.
554. Unidentified was killed in al-Shamaa mosque in Gaza City.
555. Ibrahim Dib Ahmad al-Kilani, 53, was killed in a strike on Israa tower in Gaza City along with his wife and their five children. Four members of his wife’s family were also killed in the attack.
556. Taghrid Shaaban Mohammed al-Kilani, 45, was killed in the same attack.
557. Yaser Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 8, was killed in the same attack.
558. Elias Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 4, was killed in the same attack.
559. Sawsan Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 11, was killed in the same attack.
560. Rim Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 12, was killed in the same attack.
561. Yaseen Ibrahim Dib al-Kilani, 9, was killed in the same attack.
562. Mahmoud Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 37, was killed in the same attack.
563. Aida Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 47, was killed in the same attack.
564. Soura Shaaban mohammed Derbas, 41, was killed in the same attack.
565. Inas Shaaban Mohammed Derbas, 30, was killed in the same attack.
566. Jihad Mahmoud al-Maghribi, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
567. Fadi Bashir al-Abadleh, 22, was killed in Khan Younis.
568. Unknown
569. Unknown
570. Unknown

Tuesday, July 22:

571. Wael Jamal Harb, 32, was killed in Gaza.
572. Hasan Khodor Bakr, 60, was killed in Gaza.
573. Mahmoud Suleiman Abu Sobha, 55, was killed in Khan Younis.
574. Abdullah Ismail al-Bahisi, 27, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
575. Misaab Saleh Salameh, 19, was killed in Khan Younis.
576. Mohammed Nasr Haroun, 38, was killed in al-Nsayrat.
577. Naji Jamal al-Fajm, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
578. Ibtihal Ibrahim al-Rimahi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
579. Youssef Ibrahim al-Rimahi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
580. Iman Ibrahim al-Rimahi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
581. Salwa Abu Monifi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
582. Samira Abu Monifi was killed in Deir al-Balah.
583. Haytham Samir al-Agha, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
584. Walid Suleiman Abu Daher, 21, was killed in Khan Younis.
585. Yasmin Ahmad Abu Mor, 25, was killed in Rafah.
586. Sameh Zahir al-Sowafiri, 29, was killed in Rafah.
587. Mohammed Moussa Abu Fayad, 36, was killed in Rafah.
588. Fatima Hasan Azzam, 70, was killed in al-Zaytoun.
589. Maryam Hasan Azzam, 50, was killed in al-Zaytoun.
590. Unknown
591. Unknown
592. Unknown
593. Unknown
594. Unknown
595. Unknown
596. Soha Naim al-Kharwat, 25, was killed in north Gaza along with her daughter Mona. She was pregnant.
597. Mona Rami al-Kharwat, 4, was killed in the same attack.
598. Ahmad Salah abu Sido, 17, was killed in al-Mahatta.
599. Mahmoud Slim Mostafa Daraj, 22, was killed in Jabalia.
600. Ibrahim Sobhi al-Firi, 25, was killed in Beit Lahia.
601. Ahmad Assaad al-Boudi, 24, was killed in Beit Lahia.
602. Unknown was killed in Beit Lahia.
603. Raed Salah, 22, was killed in al-Breij.
604. Ahmad Nasim Saleh, 23, was killed in al-Breij.
605. Mahmoud Ghanem, 22, was killed in al-Breij.
606. Hasan Shaaban Khamisi, 28, was killed in al-Maghazi camp.
607. Tareq Fayeq Hajjaj, 22, was killed in Gaza.
608. Ahmad Ziad Hajjaj, 21, was killed in the same attack.
609. Mohammed Shahadeh Hajjaj, 31, was killed in the same attack.
610. Fayza Saleh Abdul Rahman Hajjaj, 66, was killed in the same attack.
611. Rawan Ziad Hajjaj, 15, was killed in the same attack.
612. Youssef Mohammed Hajjaj, 28, was killed in the same attack.
613. Hakema Nafea Abu Edwan, 75, was killed in Rafah.
614. Najah Nafea Abu Edwan, 85, was killed in the same attack.
615. Misaab Nafeth al-Ajala, 30, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
616. Khalaf Atieh Abu Sanima, 18, was killed in Rafah.
617. Khalil Atieh Abu Sanima, 20, was killed in the same attack.
618. Mohammed Jamal al-Jarif, 24, was killed in Khan Younis.
619. Ahmad Issam Wishah, 29, was killed in al-Wista.
620. Ahmad Kamal Abu Maghsib, 35, was killed in al-Wista.
621. Raed Abdulrahman Abu Mighsib, 35, was killed in al-Wista.
622. Ahmad Mohammed Ramadan, 30, was killed in al-Wista.
623. Mostafa Mohammed Mahmoud Fayad, 24, was killed in Gaza.
624. Unknown was found in al-Aqsa Martyrs Hospital.
625. Hani Awad Awda Samour, 75, was killed in Khan Younis.
626. Ahmad Ibrahim Shbeir was killed in Khan Younis.
627. Youssef Abu Mostafa, 27, was killed in Nosayrat.
628. Obeida Abu Howayshil was killed in Nosayrat.
629. Nour al-Islam Abu Howayshil, 12, was killed in Nosayrat.
630. Radi Abu Howayshil, 20, was killed in Nosayrat.
631. Samih Abu Jalalah, 64, was killed in Rafah.

Wednesday, July 23:

632. Hamza Ziadeh Abu Anza, 18, was killed in Khan Younis.
633. Osama Bahjat Rajab, 21, was killed in Beit Lahia.
634. Mohammed Dauood Hamoudah, 23, was killed in Beit Lahia.
635. Sadam Ibrahim Abu Assi, 23, was killed in Khan Younis.
636. Wisam Alaa Najjar, 17, was killed in Khan Younis.
637. Unknown was killed in Khan Younis.
638. Unknown was killed in the same attack.
639. Unknown was killed in the same attack.
640. Unknown was killed in Beit Lahia.
641. Unknown was killed in Beit Lahia.
642. Mohammed Mansour al-Bashiti, was killed in Khan Younis.
643. Bassam Abdullah Abu Taimah, 23, was killed in the same attack.
644. Mohammed Naim Abu Taimah, 25, was killed in the same attack.
645. Zainab Abu Tir, a child, was killed in the same attack.
646. Ismail Abu Zarifa, 60, was killed in the same attack.
647. Mojahed Marwan Said al-Skafi, 20, was killed in al-Shujayeh,
648. Adnan Ghazi Habib, 23, was killed in al-Mighraqa.
649. Mohammed Radi Abu Raida, 22, was killed in Bani Souhayla.
650. Nidal Hamad al-Ajla, 25, was killed in al-Shamaa mosque.
651. Mohammed Ziad Habib, 30, was killed in Gaza city.
652. Unknown
653. Hasan Abu Hin, 70, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
654. M. Osama Abu Hin, 34, was killed in the same attack.
655. Al-Mostafa Abdulrahman Abu Hin, 24, was killed in the same attack.
656. Hasan Khalil Salah Abu Jamous, 29, was killed in Khan Younis.
657. Mahmoud Youssef Khaled al-Abadilah, 22, was killed in the same attack.
658. Nour Abdulrahman al-Abadilah, 24, was killed in the same attack.
659. Mohammed Farid al-Astal was killed in the same attack.
660. Unknown was killed in the same attack.
661. Mohammed Abed al-Raouf al-Deddeh, 39, was killed in Gaza.
662. Ahmad Mohammed Bilbol was killed in Gaza.
663. Hosam Ayman Ayyad, 24, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
664. Mohammed Sami Omran, 26, was killed in Khan Younis.
665. Mahmoud Awwad Ziadeh was killed in Gaza.
666. Wissam Bahjat Rajab was killed in the same attack.
667. Rabea Qassem Abu Ras was killed in the same attack.
668. Azzat Omaya al-Sayyed was killed in the same attack.
669. Ahmad Adel Homaydah was killed in the same attack.
670. Manal Mohammed al-Astal, 45, was killed in Khan Younis.
671. Yasmin Hasan Mohammed al-Moqataa, 27, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
672. Jounay Rami Yasser al-Moqataa, 2, was killed in the same attack.
673. Said Ahmad Taqfiq Tawil, 22, was killed in the same attack.
674. Raed Salem al-Radea, 20, was killed in Gaza.
675. Salma Salem al-Radea, 2, was killed in the same attack.
676. Iyad Ghaleb al-Radea, 19, was killed in the same attack.
677. Atef Ahmad Abu Daqa, was killed in Khan Younis.
678. Dr. Ibrahim Omar al-Halaq, 40, was killed in the same attack.
679. Wael Maher Awad, 23, was killed in the same attack.
680. Ahmad Mahmoud Sahwil, 23, was killed in the same attack.
681. Issam Ismail Abu Shaqra, 42, was killed in the same attack.
682. Abdel Rahman Ibrahim Abu Shaqra, 17, was killed in the same attack.
683. Mohammed Ahmad Akram Abu Shaqra, 17, was killed in the same attack.
684. Unknown
685. Ayman Adhab Youssef al-Hajj Ahmad, 16, was killed in al-Breij.
686. Bilal Ali Ahmad Abu Adhra, 25, was killed in the same attack.
687. Abdel Karim Nasser Saleh Abu Jarmi, 24, was killed in the same attack.
688. Alaa Jihad Ali Khatab, 25, was killed in Deir al-Balah.
689. Abdel Qadir Jamil al-Khaldi, 23, was killed in al-Breij.
690. Fayez Nayef al-Thatha, 24, was killed in al-Zeitoun.
691. Fayez Naim al-Thatha, 17, was killed in the same attack.
693. Unknown
694. Unknown
695. Unknown

Thursday, July 24:

696. Bassam Khaled Abu Shahla, 44, was killed in Absan.
697. Sleiman Sleiman al-Barim, 27, was killed in the same attack.
698. Ahmad Rifaat al-Raqab, 23, was killed in the same attack.
699. Mohammed Ismail al-Istal, 17, was killed in Beni Soheileh.
700. Ismail Mohammed al-Istal, 48, was killed in the same attack.
701. Ahmad Mohammed Ismail al-Istal, 20, was killed in the same attack.
702. Mohammed Hassan Abdel Qadir al-Istal, 43, was killed in the same attack.
703. Ibrahim Abdallah Abu Aytah, 67, was killed in Beit Lahia.
704. Ahmad Ibrahim Abdallah Abu Aytah, 30, was killed in the same attack.
705. Jamila Salim Abu Aytah, 65, was killed in the same attack.
706. Adham Ahmad Abu Aytah, 11, was killed in the same attack.
707. Khalil Nasser Atieh Wasah, 21, succumbed to his wounds after being injured in an attack in central Gaza.
708. Milad Omran al-Istal, 29, was killed in Khan Younis.
709. Mohammed Omran Khamis al-Istal, 33, was killed in the same attack.
710. Malek Amin Ahmad al-Istal, 24, was killed in the same attack.
711. Ahmad Thaer Omran al-Istal, 33, was killed in the same attack.
712. Amin Thaer Omran al-Istal, 3, was killed in the same attack.
713. Nada Thaer Omran al-Istal, 5, was killed in the same attack.
714. Unknown
715. Unknown.
716. Hadi Abdulhamid Abdulnabi, 1.5, was killed in a mosque in Jabalia.
717. Ahmad Ibrahim Said al-Qaraan, 26, was killed in al-Wista.
718. Mohammed Ibrahim Abu Aytah, 32, was killed in Jabalia.
719. Unknown
720. Unknown
721. Unknown
722. Unknown
723. Unknown
724. Unknown
725. Unknown
726. Unknown
727. Unknown
728. Unknown
729. Unknown
730. Unknown
731. Unknown
732. Mohammed Ibrahim Abu Daqqah, 42, was killed in Khuza’a.
733. Akram Ibrahim Abu Daqqah, 50, was killed in the same attack.
734. Ahmad Abdulkarim Ahmad Hasan was killed in Khan Younis.
735. Mohammed Ismail Khodor was killed in the same attack.
736. Ola Khalil Abu Aida, 27, was killed in al-Zahraa.
737. Anas Akram al-Skafi, 18, was killed in al-Shujayeh, along with his twin brother.
738. Saad Akram al-Skafi, 18, was killed in the same attack.
739. Mohammed Jihad Matar was killed in an attack on Beit Hanoun.
740. Amina Jihad Matar was killed in the same attack.
741. Tammam Mohammed Hamad was killed in the same attack.
742. Khadir Khalil al-Luh, 50, was killed in an attack on al-Attatara.
743. Rasmi Abu Rayda was killed in Khuza’a.
744. Mohammed Abu Youssef was killed in the same attack.
745. Ahmad Kodeih was killed in the same attack.
746. Rami Kodeih was killed in the same attack.
747. Ismail Hasan Abu Rajila, 57, was killed in Khan Younis.
748. Nafeth Suleiman Kodeih, 45, was killed in the same attack.
749. Badr Hatem Kodeih, 13, was killed in the same attack.
750. Hanafi Mahmoud Abu Youssef, 42, was killed in the same attack.
751. Abdulaziz Noureldine Nour, 21, was killed in al-Shujayeh.
752. Amir Adel Islam, 9, was killed in Rafah.
753. Issam Faissal Syam, 23, was killed in Rafah.
754. Amir Adel Syam, 13, was killed in Rafah.

(Al-Akhbar)

Shakir Qureshi Azhar Qayum Azad Ali Waqar Ahmed Wajahat Ali Waseem Zaffar Rubab Mehdi H Rizvi Rafi Malik Tehmina Kazi Adam Yosef Urooj Fatima David Rosser Owen Aneeqa Malik Saeed David Farman Gulf Moon Jahan Mahmood Mufti Abu Layth Zain Khan Abdul Qudues Zafar Zeshaan Ali Vassilis A. Michailidis Mohammed Saleem Alex Vasili Arts Versa Mohammed Abbasi Mohammed Abbasi Adnan Farooq Chatha

Ved Vaidik & Hafiz Saeed

July 16, 2014

ved_pratap_vaidik_hafiz_saeed

The Indian journalist Ved Vaidik has met Hafiz Saeed, the Jamaat-ud-Dawa chief, in Lahore on July 2 when the former was on a visit to Pakistan with a group of journalists and politicians invited by a peace and research institute.

The interview/meeting has caused ripples in India because of Vaidik’s close association with the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). Opposition parties swamped the ruling BJP with questions about how an Indian journalist could meet a man considered responsible for the Mumbai attack in 2008.

India’s External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj informed the Lok Sabha — the lower house of the Indian parliament — that the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi had nothing to do with the meeting. India’s Finance Minister Arun Jaitley has called the meeting a diplomatic misadventure of a private citizen. And according to Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi, Vaidik belongs to the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), a right-wing Hindu nationalist group ostensibly involved in charitable work but notorious for fanaticism.

The Congress Party has asked the government to give details about the meeting as it is a matter of national interest. It has also demanded the arrest of the journalist and a judicial inquiry into the affair.

Hafiz Saeed, on the other hand, has been shocked at the reaction of the Indian politicians to the meeting, which according to him has once again revealed the true face of India, veiled behind a so-called secular demeanour. Saeed tweeted: “Utterly shameful”, about India’s reaction.

Vaidik has defended his meeting with Saeed by calling it a personal matter that has nothing to do with the government. He said his only motive to meet Saeed was to analyse his mind about India and to understand what makes him commit such heinous crimes against India.

According to Vaidik, he has met many Indian-haters in the past to persuade them to bring peace in South Asia. Vaidik has been reported talking to Saeed about the possibility of an independent Kashmir.

Saeed on the other hand has also said that his party would not protest if Narendra Modi comes to Pakistan.

Future For Pakistani Football?

June 29, 2014
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For a third world country that is still relatively young, Pakistan has achieved notable glory in the field of sports.
Over the years, it has produced world beaters in games like hockey, cricket, squash and snooker. It has even given birth to several world class athletes and quality tennis players. But when it comes to sporting success ‘the beautiful game’ remains Pakistan’s Achilles’ heel.
Even as millions of Pakistanis join the rest of humanity to savour the ongoing FIFA World Cup in Brazil, they envy the 32 teams featuring in the quadrennial spectacle. The question many Pakistan fans inevitably ask themselves is why their national team cannot make the cut for what is the most watched sports event in the world? Why is their country – which sees itself as a regional power when it comes to sports – languishing at a joint 164th spot in international football rankings along with tiny Nepal? Why does Pakistan trail behind even its South Asian neighbours Afghanistan, India and even Maldives? Why such failure when they keep hearing claims that there is an abundance of football talent in the country with nurseries like the crime-infested locality of Lyari in Karachi and the border town of Chaman in Balochistan routinely producing exciting young talent?

The problem with Pakistan football, like with so many other areas of the country, is its flawed system.
The country is brimming with raw talent, a fact that is time and again proved by Pakistan’s success in junior football events. At that level, Pakistan has won regional titles time and again. But our football chiefs have failed to translate that immense potential into even modest success at the international level. It’s not that the Pakistan Football Federation (PFF) is not doing anything. It has been making tall claims and has even announced that its so-called ‘Vision 2022’ project will pave the path for Pakistan’s maiden World Cup appearance in the 2022 event in Qatar.
But the ground reality is that the PFF remains an inefficient body that has achieved precious little other than lip service. It has failed to fix what is a flawed domestic system and has done little to take concrete steps to bring Pakistan closer to World Cup qualification.
The bitter fact is that with each passing year, Pakistan football gets further from achieving its most cherished dream: winning a World Cup spot. That will continue to happen unless people at the helm of national football affairs get their act together and start doing much more than making hollow promises.

Welcoming Ramadān by Sheikh Salman al-Oadah

June 29, 2014
 
 
Welcome to the month of goodness and mercy, the month of repentance and forgiveness, the month of remembering Allah and reading the Qur’an. The arrival of Ramadān is a joyous occasion and a great blessing. So let’s welcome this generous month and this noble season. 

The righteous believers cannot help but rejoice at the arrival of Ramadān. It is the month wherein they develop their piety and faith through the exercise of willpower and self-restraint. 

How can we not rejoice when we recall the numerous blessings Allah has prepared for us, and how He will forgive us our sins and reward us for our good deeds many times over? How can the believers not rejoice at the prospect of Tarāwīh prayer by which our sins are forgiven and past mistakes wiped away? How can we not rejoice at the Night of Decree, Laylah al-Qadr, a night that is better than a thousand months? 

How can we not rejoice at the month of the Qur’an, the month of remembering Allah and the spiritual climate that spreads its sweet fragrance everywhere. It is the month when our souls are at ease and our hearts feel large and full of goodness. This is Allah’s grace. “Say: In the bounty of Allah and in His mercy – in that let them rejoice.” [Sūrah Yūnus: 58] 

The month of Ramadān makes all believers rejoice and puts their hears at ease. It is a time to develop ourselves spiritually, where we can rid ourselves of bad ingrained habits and develop good ones. We need to appreciate this opportunity and the powerful effect it can have on us. The extra worship we are encouraged to engage in during this month, whether great or small, should have a lasting and substantial effect. It does not have to be something transient or seasonal. 

The month of Ramadān is an intensive course in faith. We engage in various acts of worship in turn: prayer, fasting, charity, and reading the Qur’an. When we learn to understand and appreciate why these acts of worship are prescribed for us and therefore offer them correctly, we derive the full benefit from them and they have a profound effect on our lives. As Allah says: “O you who believe! Fasting is prescribed for you as it had been prescribed for those who came before you, that perchance you can be God-fearing.” [Sūrah al-Baqarah: 183] 

Many of the great and blessed events in our history took place in Ramadān. The greatest of these is the revelation of the Qur’an. It is therefore a month of commemoration as well as a month of worship and active engagement. Therefore, its arrival deserves our warmest welcome, and the best way we can give it that welcome is to develop a deep understanding of great virtue of this month and the worship we are about to engage in. 

We should prepare for the arrival of this special month by purifying our hearts and increasing our portion of worship. We should strive to make our intentions sincere to Allah alone and turn to Him in repentance. We should get ourselves ready to benefit from the spiritual opportunities this month provides and the chance to be among the righteous.

The US-Pakistan ties that bind

June 22, 2014

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No Exit from Pakistan: America’s Tortured Relationship with Islamabad by Daniel S Markey 

As events unfolded in the this month’s audacious terror attack on Karachi International Airport, discussion in the Twitter space in Pakistan buzzed with hash tags like #Karachiairportattack, #ASF ,#raymonddavisnetwork and #dirtywars. This underlines the deep skepticism of many, if not all, in Pakistan about United States involvement in stoking creative chaos in the country. 

So what does this mean for the future of Pakistan-US relations? Daniel S Markey’s latest volume on US-Pakistan relations attempts to answer exactly this difficult question. 

Markey argues that Pakistan is potentially a hostile and difficult state for United States to manage but despite several setbacks and failures in the bilateral relationship, neither Pakistan nor the United States can afford a permanent breakup. 

He maintains that immediate, vital and emergent threats emanating from Pakistan will have a negative impact on US regional interests in South Asia, Central Asia and the Middle East. It is due to this, the author argues, that contrary to what many experts and officials may feel in Washington, the United States cannot afford to disengage. 

Markey systematically survey’s Pakistan-US relations, as he sees them, at the three levels of domestic, regional and international politics – helping the reader easily grasp book’s arguments presented. He skillfully links all arguments on these three levels to broader US interests in the region. 

The broad theme of this book is that Pakistan has become a more dangerous country for US interests and poses difficult challenges for it to manage. The author makes this conclusion based on his observations of societal trends – a move towards the radical right – and a deterioration of state institutions and governance weaknesses. 

The author says that these trends, coupled with Pakistan’s geopolitical and geostrategic location, will create problems for US policy if the bilateral relationship is not stabilized. 

Detailing the domestic milieu, Markey identifies four different faces of Pakistan: an elite-dominated country where feudals and top industrialists have appropriated its resources, a garrison state where the political center of power is the military, a terrorist incubator and lastly, a land of youthful idealists. 

The author explains the evolution of this politico-socio-economic structure and arrives at three potential scenarios in the trajectory of the Pakistan state. 

The first is that there will be a revolution and a failure of the state, the second is there will be a continuation of crisis without a revolution, and the third scenario is the success of reformist politics. 

The roots of anti-American sentiment within all the camps inside Pakistan – ie the liberals, the nationalists and the Islamists – are also identified in detail and the author discusses how these beliefs have played a role in frustrating US financial and political investments. 

A significant portion of the book covers the larger geopolitical context of US engagement with Pakistan and the South Asia region. The author has correctly identified that US engagement with Pakistan does not exist in a vacuum and is influenced by what was happening in the broader region and at the international level. 

In the Cold War days, the author argues, containment of communism was the strategic context of US engagement with Pakistan, and this led to security alliances and economic support. In contemporary times, the managing of China’s rise has become the operative context. So the interest is not in Pakistan per se but the broader region which has driven US policy towards Pakistan. 

The author also outlines policy options and their consequences for the United States in dealing with Pakistan. The options he presents are: “defensive insulation”, “military first cooperation” and the “comprehensive approach”. 

The option of “defensive insulation” entails a more robust US pressure on Pakistan in case the US fails to get cooperation from a hostile Pakistan government. This can be achieved by building diplomatic, military and political barriers around Pakistan’s geographic surroundings. The US should also be prepared to target Pakistan’s nuclear program militarily, he argues. 

For “military first cooperation”, Markey says that the US should enhance its military to military cooperation with Pakistan in order to cultivate officers within the ranks. The objective of this strategy is to counter increasing Islamist and anti-American currents within the army. 

“Comprehensive approach” argues for expending more US economic, cultural and political capital in order to build moderate constituencies. Markey does not argue for the US to subsidize Pakistan’s economic growth and maintains that this work has to be done by Pakistanis themselves. 

For South Asia watchers, this book will enhance understanding of US policy towards Pakistan and South Asia. Three other books on similar topics have come from United States recently, written by important policy scholars. It is interesting to note that Markey’s assessment offers nothing fundamentally different from what these have discussed. 

In fact, this book represents continuity in the US thinking towards South Asia, anchored around three principles of its rebalancing to Asia-Pacific: the containment of China, propping up India as a regional counter-weight to China, and pressurizing Pakistan to subsidize India’s growth in the region. 

Since the present government came to office in Pakistan in 2013, it has become clear that Obama administration has reviewed the tactics of its approach towards Islamabad – but not the strategic paradigm. 

The US tactics includes components of all the three policy options laid out by the author of this book, such as managing anti-Americanism sentiment through less visible involvement, giving time to the Nawaz administration to settle down, and suspending drone strikes. It can also be seen in US moves to push the International Monetary Fund to inject money into Pakistan’s economy, in increasing people-to-people contacts and in support for Nawaz’s overtures to India. 

The book reaffirms a rare consensus among the nationalists, Islamists and to a certain extent the liberal class within the policy elites in Pakistan: that US-Pakistan relations will remain transactional to say the least and outright hostile in other cases – despite the pleasantries of strategic dialogue process. 

It is also difficult to agree with any author that says radical political change in Pakistan will lead to collapse of the state. Linking the two without any reasonable proof reflects simplicity on the behalf of many Western academics in studying an otherwise complex subject of state, society and political order. 

Navigating the country through the negative currents of contemporary US policy in South Asia will be a real test of Pakistani statecraft. 

No Exit from Pakistan: America’s Tortured Relationship with Islamabad by Daniel S Markey. Cambridge University Press, 2013. ISBN-10: 1107623596. Price: US$24.68; 253 pages. 

Reviewed by Majid Mahmood 

Majid Mahmood is a research officer for foreign affairs at the Center for International Strategic Studies Islamabad (CISS) and a post -graduate scholar in the International Relations Department at the National Defense University, Pakistan. 

(Copyright 2014 Majid Mahmood) 

Iraq pays price of US sectarian meddling

June 19, 2014
 

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Labeiki ya Zaynab” chanted Iraqi Shi’ite fighters as they swayed, dancing with their rifles before TV news cameras in Baghdad on June 13. They were apparently getting ready for a difficult fight ahead. For them, it seemed that a suitable war chant would be answering the call of Zaynab, the daughter of Imam Ali, the great Muslim Caliph who lived in Medina 14 centuries ago. That was the period through which the Shi’ite sect slowly emerged, based on a political dispute whose consequences are still felt until this day. 

That chant alone is enough to demonstrate the ugly sectarian nature of the war in Iraq, which has reached an unprecedented highpoint in recent days. Fewer than 1,000 fighters from the the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS) advanced against Iraq’s largest city of Mosul on June 10, sending two Iraqi army divisions (nearly 30,000 soldiers) to a chaotic retreat. 

The call to arms was made by a statement issued by Iraq’s most revered Shi’ite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, and read on his behalf during a Friday prayer’s sermon in Kerbala. “People who are capable of carrying arms and fighting the terrorists in defense of their country … should volunteer to join the security forces to achieve this sacred goal,” the statement in part read. 

The terrorists of whom Sistani speaks are those of ISIS, whose numbers throughout the region is estimated to be at only 7,000 fighters. They are well organized, fairly well-equipped and absolutely ruthless in their conduct. 

To secure their remarkable territorial gains, they quickly moved south, closing in on other Iraqi towns: They attacked and took over Baiji on June 11. On the same day, they conquered Tikrit, the town of former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, where they were joined by ex-Baathist fighters. 

For two days, they tried to take over Samarra, but couldn’t, only to move against Jalawala and Saaddiyah, to the east of Baghdad. It is impossible to verify reports of what is taking place in towns that fall under the control of ISIS, but considering their notoriously bloody legacy in Syria, and ISIS’s own online reporting on their own activities, one can expect the worse. 

Within days, ISIS was in control of a large swathe of land which lumped together offers a new map fully altering the political boundaries of the Middle East that were largely envisioned by colonial powers France and Britain nearly a century ago. 

What the future holds is difficult to predict. The US administration is petrified by the notion of getting involved in Iraq once more. It was its original meddling, at the behest of the notorious neoconservatives who largely determined US foreign policy during George W. Bush’s administration that ignited this ongoing strife in the first place. They admitted failure and withdrew in December 2011, hoping to sustain a level of influence over the Iraqi government under Shi’ite Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki. They failed miserably as well and it is now Iran that is an influential foreign power in Baghdad. 

In fact, Iran’s influence and interests are so strong that despite much saber-rattling by US President Barack Obama, the US cannot possibly modify the massively changing reality in Iraq without Iranian help. Reports in US and British media are pointing to possible US-Iranian involvement to counter ISIS, not just in Iraq, but also in Syria. 

History is accelerating at a frantic speed. Seemingly impossible alliances are being hastily formed. Maps are being redrawn in directions that are determined by masked fighters with automatic weapons mounted on the back of pickup trucks. True, no one could have predicted such events, but when some warned that the Iraq war would “destabilize” the Middle East for many years to come, this is precisely what they meant. 

When Bush led his war on Iraq in order to fight al-Qaeda, the group simply didn’t exist in that country; the war however, brought al-Qaeda to Iraq. A mix of hubris and ignorance of the facts – and lack of understanding of Iraq’s history – allowed the Bush administration to sustain that horrible war. Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis perished in an immoral military quest. Those who were not killed, were maimed, tortured, raped or fled into a borderless Iraqi odyssey. 

The Americans toyed with Iraq in numerous ways. They dissolved the army, dismissed all government institutions, attempted to restructure a new society based on the recommendations of Pentagon and CIA analysts in Washington DC and Virginia. They oppressed the Sunni Muslims, empowered the Shi’ites, and fed the flame of sectarianism with no regard to the consequences. When things didn’t go as planned, they tried to empower some Shi’ite groups over others, and armed some Sunni groups to fight the Iraqi resistance to the war, which was mostly made of Sunni fighters. 

And the consequences were most bloody. Iraq’s civil war of 2006-07 claimed tens of thousands to be added to the ever-growing toll caused by the war adventure. No sham elections were enough to remedy the situation, no torture technique was enough to suppress the rebellion, and no fiddling with the sectarian or ethnic demographics of the country was enough to create the coveted “stability”. 

In December 2011, the Americans ran away from the Iraq inferno, leaving behind a fight that was not yet settled. What is going on in Iraq right now is an integral part of the US-infused mayhem. It should be telling enough that the leader of ISIS, Abu Baker al-Baghdadi is an Iraqi from Samarra, who fought against the Americans and was himself held and tortured in the largest US prison in Iraq, Camp Bucca for five years. 

It would be imprecise to state that ISIS started in the dungeon of a US prison in Iraq. The ISIS story needs to be examined in greater depth as it runs deep through the heart of this conflict. It is as mysterious as the masked characters who are blowing people up with no mercy and beheading with no regard to the upright values of the religion they purport to represent. 

But there can be no denying that the US’s ignorant orchestration of the mass oppression of Iraqis, and Sunnis in particular during the 2003 war until their much touted withdrawal was a major factor in ISIS’ formation, and in the extremist group’s horrendous levels of violence. 

It is unclear whether ISIS will be able to hold onto the territories it gained or sustain itself in a battle that involves Shi’ite-controlled Baghdad, Iran and the US. But a few things are certain: 

The systematic political marginalization of Iraq’s Sunni communities is both senseless and unsustainable. A new political and social contract is needed to re-order the mess created by the US invasion, and other foreign intervention in Iraq, including that of Iran. 

The nature of the conflict has become so convoluted that a political settlement in Iraq would have to tackle a similar settlement in Syria, which is serving as a breeding ground for brutality, by the Syrian regime and opposition forces, especially ISIS. That factory of radicalization must close down as soon as possible in a way that would allow Syria’s wounds, and by extension Iraq’s, to heal. 

Ramzy Baroud is the Managing Editor of Middle East Eye. He is an internationally-syndicated columnist, a media consultant, an author and the founder of PalestineChronicle.com. His latest book is My Father Was a Freedom Fighter: Gaza’s Untold Story(Pluto Press, London).

Two Generations of Scottish Muslim Politicians – Bashir Maan and Humza Yousaf

June 17, 2014

Originally posted on Journey into Europe:

In Glasgow, the Journey into Europe team interviewed two distinguished Muslim politicians representing two different generations– Bashir Maan and Humza Yousaf.

Mr. Bashir Maan, CBE, is a leading Scottish politician, businessman, judge, community worker and writer. In 1968 he was appointed Justice of the Peace for the City of Glasgow, the first Asian and Muslim Justice of the Peace in Scotland. 1970, he was the first Muslim to be elected to public office in the United Kingdom, serving as a Labour Party councillor for the Kingston ward of Glasgow. He is the author of the books New Scots and The Thistle and the Crescent.

Mr. Humza Yousaf, MSP, is a member of the pro-independence Scottish National Party and represents Glasgow in Scottish Parliament. He is currently the Scottish Minister for External Affairs and International Development and is an alum of the University of Glasgow.

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